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Living in Thailand

Thais have the reputation of being some of the most fun loving, easy-going and tolerant people in the world. They welcome visitors and are happy to introduce them to Thai culture. Many teachers pursue traditional arts such as cooking, Thai boxing and meditation. Some have settled here permanently.

Bangkok is a vibrant and exciting city, with very modern shopping and entertainment areas, as well as tranquil temples, bustling traditional markets and a dynamic and varied nightlife. The cost of living is relatively low. Most people love the food and eat out all the time. Beaches are a couple of hours bus ride out of the city.

Apartments are good value and basic services like laundry are cheap. The school puts new teachers up in a nearby hotel for the first day, and helps find suitable apartments. Typically, a modern apartment near the schools costs between 8,000-10,000 baht. Utilities may cost about 1-2,000 baht monthly, including electricity, water and laundry.

Most apartments come with air conditioner, TV, fridge and perhaps some basic cooking equipment.

Most taxi rides within the city are under 100 baht (2 pounds), and the Sky Train allows you to cross the city for 55 baht. A bus trip is less than 20 pence. A two-hour bus trip to the beach is less than 200 baht (under 4 pounds) return.

Eating out is very cheap, but depends, of course, on your taste. Thais eat out much more than most Westerners, and the variety of food available in the city is incredible. Local Thai food is excellent, but if you crave something exotic, like a Scotch egg or a balti, you’ll find all kinds of food is available here.

Security is no more an issue here than it would be in Europe. In fact expatriates living here would say that Thailand is a very safe place to live. People go out, day or night, without concern.

Medical services, including dental services, are top-class and significantly cheaper than in the West.

Cultural pursuits Many people are attracted to Thailand through their interest in Thai culture, which has many unique and interesting qualities. Some believe the food is among the best in the world with its spicy tastes and vibrant colours. Others are fascinated by the ancient temples and the wisdom of Buddhism.

Bangkok has many places of interest for visitors and a few hours travel outside the city you can also find varied and exciting places to spend a weekend such as the old capital of Ayuddhya or the famous bridge over the River Kwai in Kanchanaburi. Many teachers are involved in cultural pursuits, such as cooking classes, Thai boxing or meditation.

Thai language.
The Thai language can seem daunting at first: it has five tones and a 44 character writing system. Spoken Thai is relatively easy. Thais very much appreciate visitors’ efforts to speak Thai and most teachers are able to pick up at least the rudiments quite quickly. The school offers free Thai lessons to teachers – depending on demand and availability, and there are many books available and classes throughout the city.

Climate.
The climate in Thailand is usually either hot, or hot and wet. The schools, and most other buildings, are fiercely air-conditioned.

Clothes King’s College requires a ‘professional’ standard of dress which is more formal than the smart/casual look favoured in the West. Thai students look up to teachers and expect them to look the part. Smart trousers, long sleeved shirt and tie for men. Equivalent for women. No open-toed shoes, sandals or ‘beach wear’.

You can get almost everything you need in the shops in Thailand. Boots has branches in Bangkok – prices a bit higher than at home. There are western style shops and restaurants all over the city.

We hope that you will decide to join us at King’s College!

We are sure that your time with us will be rewarding both professionally and personally, an exciting experience of another culture, and a lot of fun.

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Contact for recruitment

In the UK/Europe contact: hudson.111@virgin.net

“Candidates based in the UK should submit their CVs and a recent photograph to John Hudson on hudson.111@virgin.net